All roads, all rides, all ways

An exciting new arrival in the 2017 Ribble range is the versatile CGR – so named because of its ability to do everything and tackle all surfaces and conditions – Cross, Gravel and Road. The CGR is a light yet robust 7005 aluminium bike with disc brakes and clearance to take 35mm tyres. This cleverly designed frame could easily become the key do-it-all bike that you are looking for!

You might be just starting out on your cycling journey or perhaps looking to rationalise your bikes with an all-rounder – the CGR excels at everything from winter training or commuting duties right through to summer adventures or long-distance touring.

A light 7005 aluminium frame is coupled with a carbon fibre fork on the CGR. Disc brakes provide powerful and consistent braking that is superior to conventional rim brakes. If you're new to discs, you'll be amazed at the lever modulation (feel) and consistent power in all weather conditions.

For most people their bike purchases are carefully considered. It’s a significant investment and that’s why versatility and value for money often become major considerations. No one wants a bike that sits unused - taking up valuable space - a bike that’s not ‘pulling its weight.’

Versatility and practicality are at the core of the cleverly designed CGR - this is a bike that will not sit idle for very long. With the advantage of disc brakes, a carbon fork, mudguard mounts and pannier carrying capability this bike just ticks so many boxes.

The all-round practicality of the CGR does not prevent it from being a nimble and enjoyable ride and as the bike’s designer says: “We wanted a bike that was comfortable enough to ride every day, efficient enough to ride all day and even agile enough to take off road.”

If you are looking for one bike for that can do-it-all - the CGR is for you. There are no limitations with this bike only new horizons to explore.

NB. This bike comes with full coverage mudguards ready fitted.

KEY FEATURES

1. Light but robust 7005 grade alloy frame
Specially developed for Ribble, the 7005 frameset is both comfortable and lightweight
2. Carbon Fork
Reduces weight and increases comfort whilst cycling
3. Massive 35mm Tyre Clearance
Fit skinny tyres, or increase the width and improve off-road handling
4. Pannier Rack Fitting
Front and rear rack mounts can turn the CGR into a super-commuter or touring bike
5. Mudguard Fittings
Perfect for the winter months, the frame boasts clearance and mounts for proper mudguards to keep you dry
6. Disc Brakes
More powerful and consistent than rim brakes, with no wear to the wheel rim

Advanced Bikebuilder For Further Options

Ribble CGR

We also offer unmatched customisation of your Ribble with our Advanced BikeBuilder. The Advanced BikeBuilder is where you can make more of your own decisions - choose your ideal groupset and wheels, personalise it with your own preferred finishing kit - the choices are all yours.

Start Advanced Bike Builder

Sizing & Geometry

Ribble CGR
Size A B D F G H I
S 490 529.2 124 72.5 994.2 430 74
M 520 550.6 145 73 1006.3 430 73.5
L 550 570.3 170 73 1021.4 430 73
XL 580 590.8 200 73.3 1034.5 430 72.6

Our available frame sizes

S 5' 1" - 5' 6"

Out of Stock

M 5' 6" - 5' 9"

In Stock

L 5' 10" - 6' 1"

In Stock

XL 6' 2" - 6' 4"

In Stock

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: The CGR takes tyres up to 35mm in width – should I spec 35mm tyres?
A: Our Head of Bike Design recommends a 28mm tyre for everyday riding but here in BikeBuilder you can spec up to a 35mm tyre. Wider tyres are particular suitable if you want to ride over rougher roads or gravel.
Q: What tyres would deliver good comfort and practicality for commuting?
A: Our Head of Bike Design would recommend the Schwalbe Marathon Plus 28mm, but there are many other suitable choices that can be specified in BikeBuilder. Read our guide to learn more about our durable tyres.
Q: Which pannier racks will fit this bike?
A: We recommend any Disc Compatible racks, we have a number of options and manufacturers you can choose from here.
Q: What type of riding is it best suited for?
A: The CGR is extremely versatile, with relaxed geometry, so is ideal for commuting, touring, training and everyday riding.
Q: What is the frame made of and what does it weigh?
A: Light but robust 7005 grade aluminium. The frame weighs 1790grams.
Q: Does the bike come with pedals?
A: No, pedals are a personal choice. We do however offer a wide range of pedals to be bought separately to suit all preferences.
Q: What is the warranty of the frame and what does it cover?
A: The frame has a six year warranty against manufacturing defects. All other parts have the manufacturer’s standard warranty.
Q: What is the difference between cable and hydraulic disc brakes?

A: The main difference is efficiency. Even though mechanical disc brakes will be better than rim brakes (especially in the wet), they simply can’t match the efficiency of hydraulic systems.

Mechanical disc systems have the same problems as rim systems, fundamentally cable friction or compression in the housing, which means that the force applied at the lever will be greater than the resulting force at the calliper. But that’s not the really smart part.

To put it simply, the best bit is that a hydraulic system multiplies the effort put in at the lever so the actual braking force is greater than the force applied by you. This is why hydraulic brakes on bikes give such excellent performance for comparatively little effort, you get so much feel at the lever, and can modulate your braking far more effectively.

In practice, the lever feels so light that you can basically brake using your little finger, and you have far more control over how much braking force you want to apply. One other bonus of the hydraulic system is that it’s sealed which means that it should need very little maintenance once setup other than bleeding.

Ribble CGR Customer Reviews

This is the first bike i've bought new and can't recommend it enough. The frame and fork are beefy, you dont have any worries taking onto light trails or bashing it over roots. As a road machine, it makes a great steed, i plan to use it for bikepacking and have no concerns following a few longer rides. The 105 drivetrain is amazing, very responsive and i love having the ability to trim the front derailer position whilst riding to reduce noise. The hydraulic discs provide unrivalled stopping power and make it easier to swap between my mountainbike and road bike without getting caught out whilst breaking in the wet. Ribble took a little longer than originally promised to deliver, but this wasn't a problem for me.
StyleRobot
The ride is similar and the dimensions the same as my best bike. It fits exactly what I need it for, touring with paniers. I would have paid the extra for Di gears, but not fittable with internal wires. The Ultegra gears are nearly as good, and much cheaper.
Charlie

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Ribble CGR Press Reviews

About the bike

This is the latest model to join the exhaustive range of bikes from direct sales specialists Ribble. CGR stands for ‘Cross, Gravel, Road’, marking this machine out as one which you could, theoretically, take anywhere, in all conditions. Supplied with mudguards as standard and hydraulic disc brakes, it’s well suited to riding in the typically wet and grimy British winter. We’re not testing its off-road credentials here, but one thing’s for sure – with its lairy paintjob, if you did get lost in the wild on it,  the search and rescue mob would soon find you!

The spec

Frameset The CGR uses 7005 alloy for its frameset. A curving diamond-profiled top tube meets the head tube in a seriously beefed-up section for total directness of steering. A fat, round-profiled down tube and horizontal chainstays help to give a feeling of almost immediate power transfer when you leave the saddle and give the CGR some big licks. One of the less obvious benefits of disc brakes is the extra space for tyre clearance – though it’s supplied with 25c rubber, we reckon it could easily accommodate cyclocross-spec rubber as wide as 33c. On a practical note, the carbon forks and rounded alloy seatstays also have rack mounts, in case you were looking for a load-lugger for commuting duties, or even a light off-road adventure. Versatility is the name of the game with this bike.

Groupset The Ribble’s groupset is a sensibly-specced Shimano Tiagra affair, with 105-spec brake hoods and shifters for the hydraulic brakes. It’s fair to say that 2016’s Tiagra is pretty much on a par with the 105 kit of old, and it doesn’t suffer for being 10-speed, rather than 11, either. 

Finishing kit Ribble being Ribble, you can specify many of the details of this bike differently, via the company’s online bike builder. However, the Deda handlebars and stem, which we’ve tested before this year, are solid pieces of aluminium kit, which we’d wager would withstand anything you can throw at them. We’ve also ridden on this saddle before, on the Tifosi CK7. It works even better in this set-up, helped by Ribble’s unbranded carbon seatpost.

Wheels The Shimano theme continues at the wheels, with RX rims laced with 28 spokes. The hubs use low-friction seals to keep out water, grit and dirt. This is a solid wheelset, and will accommodate tyres up to 38c, so are ready for anything. They’re basic, but they work – it’s clear where Ribble’s value-for-money eye was on this build, and that’s the hydraulic brakes. Conti’s Ultra Sport tyres aren’t what we’d choose for ‘performance riding’, but for winter training, they’re supple enough and could easily be sized up to 28s for even better comfort and cornering confidence.

The ride

First impression After donning some dark-lensed sunnies to keep the DayGlo frame from distracting us during the ride, we felt like we should have swapped them for night-vision goggles, as the CGR feels like the road bike equivalent of a tank. We liked it! The front is as solid, direct and downright stiff as anything we’ve ridden. In the first few miles of our loop, i the 85psi in that front tyre kept the worst of the vibes at bay.

On the road Comfort turns out to be an awful lot better than the opening miles had led us to expect. Although the stocky head tube and braced top tube junction make for a massive expanse of 7005 alloy, the overall geometry of the frame is decidedly upright, meaning hands are spared the worst of the road surface. A head angle and seat angle that are near-identical saves wrists from taking a battering, and the brake hoods – identical to those on the Pinnacle Dolomite 5 – are always comfortable. Shifts gel efficiently with the compact, 50/34 Shimano Tiagra chainset to ensure forward momentum is maintained. The extra weight over the other bikes here makes itself known on climbs but rolling roads are dispatched with aplomb, aided by the bike’s direct response. Arrow-straight, horizontal chainstays help, taking all your effort to the hub. The 12-28 cassette will heave you over most hills and allow you to make use of downhill momentum – we didn’t spin out once, and after moving two of the three 10mm spacers above the stem we were able to make this bike fairly aggressive. But that’s not the point – the CGR is a rugged thing, with just enough performance to excite. 

Handling Here’s where the CGR’s stiffness really allows it to shine, with downhill sweepers dispatched in the blink of an eye. Albeit a fairly lingering blink. There’s plenty of feedback through the exaggeratedly tapered carbon fork, which combines with the super-stiff front end to promote stacks of cornering confidence. In the corners, they’re never unsettled, but we were unable to test their performance in soaking conditions. Where the brakes shine is in their ability to shave off fractions of speed if you’re in danger of over-cooking a corner. Although the rear mudguard is fitted very closely to the wheel, there was never a hint of rub, despite the narrow clearance. In all, for a bike that’s designed to take on tarmac, gravel and dirt, the CGR does a pretty good job as a pure road bike.

Ribble

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