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Gain aero advantage

Ribble Aero 883 Disc

The Ribble Aero 883 came out on top in the BikesEtc magazine Aero Bike Challenge group test winning the Gold Award and it’s proved such an amazing bike that we developed a disc brake model.

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Choose a popular build
Build your own Ribble Aero 883 Disc

Don’t want to build your own? No problem. Below are the most popular builds with other riders, ready to ride or change as you like.

Aero 883 Disc Aero 883 Disc
Shimano 105
  • Shimano 105 11 speed
  • Shimano 34-50T x 11-28T gearing.
  • Shimano 105 hydraulic disc brakeset.
  • Mavic Aksium Disc wheelset.
  • Level 1 Alloy cockpit.
  • Prologo Kappa RS accent colour saddle.
From: US$1,829.12
Or from US$58.04 a month
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Aero 883 Disc Aero 883 Disc
Shimano Ultegra
  • Shimano Ultegra 11 Speed.
  • Shimano 34-50T x 11-28T gearing.
  • Shimano Ultegra hydraulic disc brakeset.
  • Mavic Aksium Disc wheelset.
  • Level 1 Alloy cockpit.
  • Prologo Kappa RS accent colour saddle.
From: US$2,259.75
Or from US$71.70 a month
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Aero 883 Disc Aero 883 Disc
Shimano Ultegra Di2
  • Shimano Ultegra Di2 11 Speed.
  • Shimano 34-50T x 11-28T gearing.
  • Shimano Ultegra hydraulic disc brakeset.
  • Mavic Aksium Disc wheelset.
  • Level 1 Alloy cockpit.
  • Prologo Kappa RS accent colour saddle.
From: US$2,905.70
Or from US$92.20 a month
Learn More
GAIN AERO ADVANTAGE
WITH MOTOR RACING PEDIGREE

Its short top tube and head tube mean that the Aero 883 Disc is perfect for both road racing and triathlon and offers a lower aerodynamic front position. The Aero 883 Disc is one of our most aerodynamic disc road frames with added stopping power.

ADVANCED
AERO DESIGN

Every inch of the Aero 883 Disc has been optimised to reduce drag, with a Kamm Tail shaped seat tube and down tube and an integrated seat clamp built into the frame. This not only looks beautiful, but also reduces wind resistance. This disc-equipped frame can accommodate the latest Direct mount disc brake calipers offering the best stopping power possible.

Up front, the specially shaped aero head tube features integrated shrouds to direct air flow around its base and the shorter top tube means you can easily fit a pair of tri-bars to give you that lower tri position for aerodynamics.

The rigorously tested aerodynamic tube profiles of the Aero 883 Disc are shaped to minimise drag and the rear wheel is tucked up behind the partially curved seat tube creating a shorter wheelbase.

DESIGN AND BUILD
PRECISION

A special blend of high-end T1000 and T800 unidirectional carbon composites ensures that the frame is both light yet stiff and has precise handling characteristics. The Aero 883’s impressed BikesEtc “the tubing is an object lesson in oversizing, especially at the keys areas for reducing flex and aiding power transfer – namely the chain stays, head tube and frankly massive bottom bracket area.”

OPTIMISED DESIGN
AND ENGINEERING

We are excited to work with a cutting edge design partner with this ground breaking bike. The Aero 883 Disc was developed in association with Performance Engineered Solutions (PES) in Sheffield, a company whose core skills have been developed in the Formula 1 and MotoGP motorsport environments. Performance improvements at elite level are, according to PES, about understanding the ‘sum of all parts’.

“That includes understanding that designs should deliver small repeatable gains in many different areas to deliver an overall winning solution. Performance at this level of sport is measured in 100ths of a second and microns. The team also has to work closely with and understand the athletes and support them so as to deliver the optimum performance package,” say our experts in aerodynamic carbon composite design and testing.

Hours of advanced computer simulations have resulted in a frameset of varying aerodynamic profiles - each optimised according to location to reduce turbulence across a wide range of wind directions (yaw angles).

BRAKES
RIM OR DISC

To bring this fast bike to a halt, you can choose between this Flat Mount disc model or the Direct Mount rim braked Aero 883.

All the same award winning features of the Aero 883 are here and now with the very latest flat mount disc brakes if you need that extra stopping power on a cutting-edge bike.

Size
Guide

To assist you in selecting the correct size simply find you height below. The graphic below illustrates our recommendations so you can be confident that the size you order will be correct.

Small
5' 5" - 5' 8"
165cm - 172cm
Medium
5' 9" - 5' 11"
175cm - 180cm
Large
6' 0" - 6' 1"
182cm - 185cm
X-Large
6' 2" - 6' 4"
187cm - 193cm
View Full Sizing & Geometry
Sizing &
Geometry
Ribble Aero 883 Disc
Size Small Medium Large X-Large
Rider Height 5'5" - 5'8"
165cm - 172cm
5'9" - 5'11"
175cm - 180cm
6'0" - 6'1"
182cm - 185cm
6'2" - 6'4"
187cm - 193cm
A - Seat Tube C-Top (mm) 478 502 522 542
B - Top Tube (mm) 527.2 547.4 566 584.6
C - Reach (mm) 380 388 396 404
D - Head Tube (mm) 118.2 140.3 165.3 187.5
E - Stack (mm) 521 543 565 587
F- Head Angle 72.1° 72.4° 72.6° 72.8°
G - Wheelbase (mm) 976 989.4 1004.7 1019.6
H - Chain Stays(mm) 412 413 414 416
I - Seat Angle 74.3° 73.7° 73.3° 72.9°
Available on
Cycle To Work

The Ribble Aero 883 Disc is available to order on cycle to work schemes.

We accept all major cycle to work scheme vouchers.

Cyclescheme logos
Finance
Calculator
US$
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Total amount repayable . APR representative. Finance is subject to status. Terms and conditions apply.
Frequently Asked
Questions
How much does the Aero 883 Disc weigh?

This Unidirectional Finish Toray 800/1000 full monocoque frame weighs 1200g and the full monocoque carbon forks 470g.

What is the warranty on the frame?

The frame carries a 2 year warranty. All other parts have the standard manufacturer's warranty.

What is the tyre clearance?

The Aero 883 Disc has clearance for 25mm tyres.

How many bottle cage mounts are there?

There are 2 bottle cage mounts.

What is the maximum rider weight?

We recommend a maximum rider weight of 120kgs.

Does it take mudguards?

No, there are no mounts for fitting mudguards.

What type of bottom bracket does the frame require?

The BB shell is PF30 68x46.

What size seatpost does the Aero 883 Disc require?

The fully aero seatpost is exclusive to the Aero 883 Disc and is supplied with the bike.

What brakes fit this frame?

The frame takes flat mount disc brakes.

Are the axles quick release or thru axle?

The frame has thru axles of diameter 12x100 front and 12x142 rear.

Is the bike supplied with pedals?

Due to the many different systems people use we do not supply pedals with bikes but you can find a great array of pedals here.

Press
Reviews

Verdict:

Impressive spec and riding capabilities

Price:

£2,187

About the bike

This new aero road bike from Lancashire’s mail order specialists has, in the firm’s own words, ‘been designed, modelled and tested in conjunction with one of the UK’s leading advanced engineering groups – Sheffield’s Performance Engineered Solutions.’ Ribble also claims this to be the most aero road race frame it has produced. We say stealthy plain carbon and high-end parts make this a cut above the rest, especially for the price. But what’s the catch? Can a bike that looks this good on paper live up to its promise?

The spec

Frameset

The Aero 883’s tubing is an object lesson in oversizing, especially at the key areas for reducing flex and aiding power transfer – namely the chainstays, head tube and frankly massive bottom bracket area. The seat tube uses a sizeable cutaway to bring the wheels as close together as possible while narrow seatstays project from the seat tube low to create as compact a rear triangle as possible. A fairly stout headtube is the most rock-solid on test, and features shrouds at its junction with the down tube to direct airflow around its base. A traditionally bladed carbon fork completes the picture at the front end. Everything about this set-up (with the exception of those naturally vibe-damping seatstays) screams solidity. And that just about sums up the way it rides, too.

Groupset

Here’s where the Aero 883 gets even more impressive. It’s equipped with a full Shimano Ultegra groupset – lighter than 105, though similar in its behaviour and operation. Our test bike came with a 50/34, compact chainset, but the beauty of Ribble is that you can spec the bike as you wish. The Ultegra brakes are direct-mount, reckoned to increase strength and be slightly more aero, as they’re closer to the frame. An 11-28 cassette combines with the 50/34 chainset to make this a perfectly tuned climbing bike as well as a pukka aero racer.

Finishing kit

This can be altered to your own specification on Ribble's bike builder, but our test bike was fitted with excellent Deda compact drop bars and a 130mm Deda Zero 2 alloy stem. Selle Italia’s moderately flexy, downward-nosed saddle sits atop an unbranded carbon seatpost.

Wheels

The crowning glory of this bike’s build is its 52mm deep-section Mavic Cosmic Pro carbon clinchers. We couldn’t tell you the last time we saw a £760 wheelset on a £2,200 bike. Despite their deep profile, they’re also the lightest wheelset of the four we tested, at 1.22kg for the front, 1.54kg for the rear. An alloy braking surface offers predictable stopping power and Mavic’s Yksion Pro Griplink tyres in 23c are sticky enough for racing.

The ride

First impression

Punchy, low, stiff and fast. Very fast. The Aero 883 straddles the line between a full-on mountain-goat stage race bike and an aero road weapon. There are two good reasons for this. Considering the number of bikes we’ve tested, it does take a lot to impress us from the off, but that’s exactly what the Ribble does, and then some.

On the road

So, back to those two good reasons. Number one is the low weight – it’s broadly half a kilo lighter than the other bikes on test. Combine this already lightweight package with a compact chainset working on an 11-28 cassette, and you’ve a bike that positively devours hills and barely suffers on rolling roads. A false flat becomes simply flat. The low, long(ish) riding position makes every corner exit an excuse for a sprint, and forced us into an almost TT-like position to make the most of the frame’s aero benefits when presented with a long, flat section of deserted tarmac. The 50/34 chainset doesn’t adversely affect acceleration or the ability to hold on to speed – you just find yourself staying closer to the 11-tooth sprocket a lot of the time. And the sensation of connectivity between pedal, rear wheel and road is something experienced more usually on a bike costing twice the price. Yet there’s more than enough comfort on offer from the unassuming carbon seatpost and effective seatstays, while the Selle Italia saddle soaks up the rest.

Handling

The shortest wheelbase of our four bikes combines with an almost endurance bike-spec, 72.1° head angle to give steering that remains settled yet direct enough to excite. There’s nothing highly-strung about this bike. Oh yes, reason number two – there’s a very good reason the Aero 883 excels in its handling and that’s the wheelset it’s rolling on. For a 52mm deep-section carbon wheelset to be the lightest on test, and on a £2,200 bike is pretty much the holy grail of hoops. The speed with which the Mavic Cosmic Pros pick up speed, and the ease with which they hold on to it, is a real joy. They enjoy crosswinds as much as any deep-section wheel, but if you can put up with that, they offer consistently high performance, and their alloy braking surface is more than adequately gripped by those direct-mount Shimano Ultegra brakes. The French firm’s Yksion Pro Griplink rubber is a clear winner here, too – although a 25c tyre would offer slightly better comfort, the Mavics supply grip, speed and confidence.

 

Cyclist

The ride

First impression Punchy, low, stiff and fast. Very fast. The Aero 883 straddles the line between a full-on mountain-goat stage race bike and an aero road weapon. There are two good reasons for this. Considering the number of bikes we’ve tested, it does take a lot to impress us from the off, but that’s exactly what the Ribble does, and then some.

 

On the road So, back to those two good reasons. Number one is the low weight – it’s broadly half a kilo lighter than the other bikes on test. Combine this already lightweight package with a compact chainset working on an 11-28 cassette, and you’ve a bike that positively devours hills and barely suffers on rolling roads. A false flat becomes simply flat. The low, long(ish) riding position makes every corner exit an excuse for a sprint, and forced us into an almost TT-like position to make the most of the frame’s aero benefits when presented with a long, flat section of deserted tarmac. The 50/34 chainset doesn’t adversely affect acceleration or the ability to hold on to speed – you just find yourself staying closer to the 11-tooth sprocket a lot of the time. And the sensation of connectivity between pedal, rear wheel and road is something experienced more usually on a bike costing twice the price. Yet there’s more than enough comfort on offer from the unassuming carbon seatpost and effective seatstays, while the Selle Italia saddle soaks up the rest.

 

Handling The shortest wheelbase of our four bikes combines with an almost endurance bike-spec, 72.1° head angle to give steering that remains settled yet direct enough to excite. There’s nothing highly-strung about this bike. Oh yes, reason number two – there’s a very good reason the Aero 883 excels in its handling and that’s the wheelset it’s rolling on. For a 52mm deep-section carbon wheelset to be the lightest on test, and on a £2,200 bike is pretty much the holy grail of hoops. The speed with which the Mavic Cosmic Pros pick up speed, and the ease with which they hold on to it, is a real joy. They enjoy crosswinds as much as any deep-section wheel, but if you can put up with that, they offer consistently high performance, and their alloy braking surface is more than adequately gripped by those direct-mount Shimano Ultegra brakes. The French firm’s Yksion Pro Griplink rubber is a clear winner here, too – although a 25c tyre would offer slightly better comfort, the Mavics supply grip, speed and confidence.

 

The spec

Frameset The Aero 883’s tubing is an object lesson in oversizing, especially at the key areas for reducing flex and aiding power transfer – namely the chainstays, head tube and frankly massive bottom bracket area. The seat tube uses a sizeable cutaway to bring the wheels as close together as possible while narrow seatstays project from the seat tube low to create as compact a rear triangle as possible. A fairly stout headtube is the most rock-solid on test, and features shrouds at its junction with the down tube to direct airflow around its base. A traditionally bladed carbon fork completes the picture at the front end. Everything about this set-up (with the exception of those naturally vibe-damping seatstays) screams solidity. And that just about sums up the way it rides, too.

 

Groupset Here’s where the Aero 883 gets even more impressive. It’s equipped with a full Shimano Ultegra groupset – lighter than 105, though similar in its behaviour and operation. Our test bike came with a 50/34, compact chainset, but the beauty of Ribble is that you can spec the bike as you wish. The Ultegra brakes are direct-mount, reckoned to increase strength and be slightly more aero, as they’re closer to the frame. An 11-28 cassette combines with the 50/34 chainset to make this a perfectly tuned climbing bike as well as a pukka aero racer.

 

Finishing kit Again, this can be altered to your own specification but our test bike was fitted with excellent Deda compact drop bars and a 130mm Deda Zero 2 alloy stem. Selle Italia’s moderately flexy, downward-nosed saddle sits atop an unbranded carbon seatpost.

 

Wheels The crowning glory of this bike’s build is its 52mm deep-section Mavic Cosmic Pro carbon clinchers. We couldn’t tell you the last time we saw a £760 wheelset on a £2,200 bike. Despite their deep profile, they’re also the lightest wheelset of the four we tested, at 1.22kg for the front, 1.54kg for the rear. An alloy braking surface offers predictable stopping power and Mavic’s Yksion Pro Griplink tyres in 23c are sticky enough for racing.

 

Overall 9.2/10

 

Punchy, stiff and very fast, the Aero 883 is also exceptionally good value.

 

Every so often, a bike blows our minds, and on this occasion it’s the Ribble Aero 883. As an exceptionally high-spec package for the price, not to mention out-performing the other three bikes in its willingness to destroy any road, it’s not only our test winner but also the winner of the BikesEtc Gold award. If you want to race, already race, or just want one of the quickest, best-value bikes on the market, this is a great choice. Even better, while our test ride worked out at £2,186.90, Ribble tell us a bike built to the same spec will be available from July for £1,999.95.

BikesEtc

Overview

Lancashire price crusaders Ribble have a long established reputation for delivering a range of top value bikes from training machines to triathlon rigs. The 833 Aero is a searingly fast, innovation loaded, aero road weapon complete with electric shifting and big brand aero wheels for a price that’s as aggressive as its’ ride character.

If the all black ‘murdered out’ aesthetics don’t immediately communicate the combative nature of the 883 then closer inspection of the frame will leave no doubt. The short head tube lends itself to an aggressively low and aerodynamic ride position. The angular frame tubes are the only ones on test to use the latest ‘Kammtail’ chopped teardrop style aerodynamic concept, which is designed to produce lower overall drag in variable wind situations. The 883 is also the only bike here to use lighter, more powerful direct mount Shimano brakes with the rear calliper hidden under the chain stays to reduce aerodynamic drag further. The internal down tube cable routing can be configured for either conventional cable routing or the Shimano Di2 electric shifting set up here, which cunningly hides the battery cell up inside the seat post out of the way of weather and wind. Despite the extra cost of the digitally triggered transmission, Ribble still rolls out this special edition bike on £850’s worth of stiff Mavic Cosmic Carbone SLS wheels with matching Mavic Yksion Griplink and Prolink tyres. You also get a top quality carbon detailed Selle Italia saddle and even the aerodynamically profiled Deda RHM 02 bar and Zero 2 stem are slightly lighter and more expensive than the 01 spec models on the Sensa and Dolan.

How it rides

High value spec isn’t worth much without ride quality to back it up, but that’s no problem with the Ribble. Immediately you clip in and press the pedals, you can feel the purposeful power delivery of the oversized rear stays and Toray T1000/800 carbon fibre mix surging through to the road and firing you forward. While the added motors and battery of Di2 mean it’s slightly heavier than the other bikes here, it attacks climbs with aggressive ‘stand up’ rather than ‘gear down’ tenacity. Thanks to the aero features the speed carries on building with impressive ease as you whirr up through the gears on the flat. It stays there without too much topping up too and there’s enough accuracy and authority in the quick steering handling to keep the Mavic wheels that have sometimes seemed gusty on other bikes behaving fine on the Ribble. The second generation Mavic Yksion tyres with softer compound ‘Griplink’ front are reassuringly surefooted when you’re exploring the 883’s natural urge to charge into corners hard and hug the tightest line too. They also let you make the most of the outstandingly positive and feedback rich power of the direct mount brakes. While firm wheel and frame feel means you have to be a bit more wary of potholes or pock marked surfaces than a smoothie like the Sensa, the Aero 883 always stayed on the acceptably purposeful rather than punishing side of the comfort coin. It’s certainly forgiving enough to take day rides or even multi day charity epics in it’s stride without leaving you walking like John Wayne and given the top value price you’ll have change spare to sponsor yourself too.

Verdict

Ribble’s Aero 883 is naturally rapid and aggressive when it comes to accelerating, climbing and cornering without being uncomfortable on multi-day missions. It’s outstanding value for a Di2 equipped bike too.

Score: 9

TriathlonPlus
Customer
Reviews
Dries
Great bike for a nice price!
I like the shape and the color of the aero frame. Ribble is not a common brand here in Belgium but every ride I get a jealous look from other riders.
Sonners
What a machine. It just wants to go fast! So much fun to ride. Munches the flat as well as the hills and the custom paint work is the cherry on top. Very very happy with it. :)
Review 1 to 2 of 38
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